How to identify Possessive Pronouns and Possessive Adjectives

Possessive adjectives (possessive determiners) and possessive pronouns are tricky and could get you confused. Here, we provide the explanation that would help you understand them in few words. Possessive adjectives: my, your, our, their, his, her and its. Possessive pronouns: mine, yours, ours, theirs, his, hers and its. Examples: pronouns The ball is yours. The gift is mine. adjectives My gift is on the table. It is your ball. A possessive adjective goes before a noun to show possession but a possessive pronoun goes after a noun and can replace it, unlike its adjective…

Read More

‘see’ or ‘watch’ a movie: all you should know

Most of us know we can see a movie when we go to the cinema, but when to use watch has somehow become an unresolved subject. Even if you browse the internet, you could be more confused as no single individual seem to give a definite answer. There are answers and explanations for this seemingly confusing pair, so read this post and search no further – and we hope you find what you need. see or watch We naturally use watch to mean that we look at something that is changing or moving…

Read More

have a bath vs take a bath

When you hear people say have a bath or take a bath, what do you think? That one is correct and the other is not? Not at all. They’re both correct, and here’s why: In this context, bath is always a noun in American English but both a noun and a verb in British English. American Americans naturally say take a bath to mean wash oneself in a tub of water and use bathe as the verb form. They however use have a shower when talking about a wedding shower, but not in the sense of…

Read More

Why ‘in a car’ but ‘on a bus’

According to some speakers of English language, the use of in and on in transportation is one of the ‘weirdness’ of prepositions. Despite this difficulty, we’ve found a simplified way of explaining it. It is however necessary to know that we might not know how this solution was found, but we found it and it’s correct. On a lighter note, who cares about ‘why’ when we know ‘how’ and we’re right? The way out When you get into a car, you sit immediately; when you get into a bus, you…

Read More

can vs could: more than past and present forms

Both can and could might sometimes get you confused, but here is the way to deal with them: can and could are called modal verbs. Modal verbs are used to talk about ability; to show belief in possibility, certainty and probability; to make offer and request; and to ask permission. Other modal verbs are may, might, shall, should, will, would, must. Modal verbs do not usually stand alone, and if they do, the main verbs are inferred. Examples: Q: Can you sing the national anthem offhand? A: I can (sing the national…

Read More