Why ‘in a car’ but ‘on a bus’

According to some speakers of English language, the use of in and on in transportation is one of the ‘weirdness’ of prepositions. Despite this difficulty, we’ve found a simplified way of explaining it. It is however necessary to know that we might not know how this solution was found, but we found it and it’s correct. On a lighter note, who cares about ‘why’ when we know ‘how’ and we’re right? The way out When you get into a car, you sit immediately; when you get into a bus, you…

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Free Ebook Download—don’t miss this

You’ve seen and studied question-and-answer books, but would you love to see one with a simplified explanation of each answer? That’s what this ebook is all about. Whether you’re studying for an examination or just need lessons in modern English, this is for you. You would love it—rest assured. May you find the knowledge you seek. Download.  

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can vs could: more than past and present forms

Both can and could might sometimes get you confused, but here is the way to deal with them: can and could are called modal verbs. Modal verbs are used to talk about ability; to show belief in possibility, certainty and probability; to make offer and request; and to ask permission. Other modal verbs are may, might, shall, should, will, would, must. Modal verbs do not usually stand alone, and if they do, the main verbs are inferred. Examples: Q: Can you sing the national anthem offhand? A: I can (sing the national…

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lose vs loose: how to know the difference

Are you confused about the use of lose and loose? Read this piece: lose The word lose (pronounced /lu:z/) is a verb that means ‘to no longer have something or be in control of it’, e.g. a thing, feeling, time, game, etc. The past tense and past participle form is ‘lost’. Examples: He predicted that they’ll lose the game even before it started. I don’t want to lose you, please stay with me. Digital Academy lost over a million naira last year. We told him the story and he’s losing his…

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Major sentence types in English

When we use language, it is not just about the grammatical line-up of words. Language function in various capacities and can be used to depict different things at different times. In English, the four major sentence types we have are: declarative sentence, imperative sentence, exclamatory sentence and interrogative sentence. Each of these functions at various levels of utterances and meaning. We use them every day, and it is not possible to neglect any of them in our day-to-day conversation—unless we decide not to talk or write. Declarative A declarative sentence…

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