Free Ebook Download—don’t miss this

You’ve seen and studied question-and-answer books, but would you love to see one with a simplified explanation of each answer? That’s what this ebook is all about. Whether you’re studying for an examination or just need lessons in modern English, this is for you. You would love it—rest assured. May you find the knowledge you seek. Download.  

Read More

can vs could: more than past and present forms

Both can and could might sometimes get you confused, but here is the way to deal with them: can and could are called modal verbs. Modal verbs are used to talk about ability; to show belief in possibility, certainty and probability; to make offer and request; and to ask permission. Other modal verbs are may, might, shall, should, will, would, must. Modal verbs do not usually stand alone, and if they do, the main verbs are inferred. Examples: Q: Can you sing the national anthem offhand? A: I can (sing the national…

Read More

lose vs loose: how to know the difference

Are you confused about the use of lose and loose? Read this piece: lose The word lose (pronounced /lu:z/) is a verb that means ‘to no longer have something or be in control of it’, e.g. a thing, feeling, time, game, etc. The past tense and past participle form is ‘lost’. Examples: He predicted that they’ll lose the game even before it started. I don’t want to lose you, please stay with me. Digital Academy lost over a million naira last year. We told him the story and he’s losing his…

Read More

Prepositions: uses and misuses

Prepositions generally give information on location, time and place in connection with people, things and events. They tell us the physical position of an entity, the period of an event and the realistic relationship between people, things and locations. They’re usually followed by nouns or noun phrases. Examples of prepositions: about, around, above, in, at, by, beneath, against, among, anti, along, below, beside, near, to, of, off, on, towards, down, during, instead of, according to, apart from, ahead of, in spite of, in place of, except for, etc. Note: instead…

Read More

Pronouns: understanding the basics

A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun to avoid repetition or make an expression less cumbersome. Pronouns are used in both subject and object positions in a sentence, i.e. they can be the performer of the action in a sentence or the receiver. We have: Personal pronouns: I (me), you (you), we (us), he (him), she (her), it (it), they (them). Note that object pronouns are in bracket. Possessive pronouns: yours, mine, theirs, ours, hers, his, its. Reflexive pronouns: myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, yourselves,…

Read More