Order of adjectives simplified

The arrangement of adjectives has been quite a task for a number of English language users.…

Free Ebook Download: questions, answers, explanations…

You’ve seen and studied questions/answers books, but would you love to see one with a simplified…

Asking questions: difference between ‘which’ and ‘what’

Both which and what are used to ask questions and might be used interchangeably. However, there’s a…

Adverbs: types, functions, exceptions

An adverb tells us more about a verb, an adjective, another adverb or even a noun…

Gerunds vs Present Participles: the simplified explanation

A gerund is easy to spot in any sentence provided you know how it functions. A…

How to identify Possessive Pronouns and Possessive Adjectives

Possessive adjectives (possessive determiners) and possessive pronouns are tricky and could get you confused. Here, we…

have a bath vs take a bath

When you hear people say have a bath or take a bath, what do you think? That one…

Why ‘in a car’ but ‘on a bus’

According to some speakers of English language, the use of in and on in transportation is…

can vs could: more than past and present forms

Both can and could might sometimes get you confused, but here is the way to deal…

lose vs loose: how to know the difference

Are you confused about the use of lose and loose? Read this piece: lose The word…

Prepositions: uses and misuses

Prepositions generally give information on location, time and place in connection with people, things and events.…

Pronouns: understanding the basics

A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun to avoid repetition or make…

loggerhead vs loggerheads

The words ‘loggerhead’ and ‘loggerheads’ belong to the same part of speech (nouns) but have different…

everyday vs every day: How not to be confused

‘Everyday’ and ‘every day’ are both correct but used in different contexts, and research shows some…

May and might: uses in today’s English

May and might are confusing to a large number of speakers, and even more so because…

Stan: an English word credited to Eminem

Oxford English Dictionary has officially added the word ‘stan’ to the dictionary. The word is the…

… someone’s appetite: wet or whet

The expression ‘whet someone’s appetite’ is often incorrectly written as ‘wet someone’s appetite’. The correct form…

Unaware vs unawares

Both ‘unaware’ and ‘unawares’ are correct. Unaware (adjective) Not having the knowledge or realisation of something.…

Difference between ‘snob’ and ‘snub’

snob (noun) A person who likes only people of high social class, has extremely high standards,…

How to use do/does/did in question

Do you get confused with the action in every question like ‘Does he visit (or visits)…