Pronouns: understanding the basics

A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun to avoid repetition or make…

cannot or can not: the simple rules

The difference between cannot and can not is confusing to a number of English language users.…

It is I vs It is me: the simplified explanation

There has been an age-long debate on the use of It is I/It is me and…

Restrictive and non-restrictive relative clauses

restrictive (defining) relative clause A restrictive relative clause (defining relative clause) is that clause that explains…

Clauses simplified

When you join grammatical units and they contain a main verb, a clause is born. Just…

What exactly is a phrase?

A phrase is a group of word (usually small) that forms part of a clause and…

loggerhead vs loggerheads

The words ‘loggerhead’ and ‘loggerheads’ belong to the same part of speech (nouns) but have different…

Oxford comma: why comma before ‘and’, ‘or’ is necessary

This usage of the comma has instigated arguments from writers and grammarians over the years. As…

May and might: uses in today’s English

May and might are confusing to a large number of speakers, and even more so because…

… someone’s appetite: wet or whet

The expression ‘whet someone’s appetite’ is often incorrectly written as ‘wet someone’s appetite’. The correct form…

Unaware vs unawares

Both ‘unaware’ and ‘unawares’ are correct. Unaware (adjective) Not having the knowledge or realisation of something.…

What does ‘I stand corrected’ mean?

Did you know the expression ‘I stand corrected’ has been used incorrectly over a long period…

What’s so special about ‘OK’?

The popular informal word ‘OK’ is a capitalised word except when written as ‘okay’. According to…

Difference between ‘snob’ and ‘snub’

snob (noun) A person who likes only people of high social class, has extremely high standards,…

How to use do/does/did in question

Do you get confused with the action in every question like ‘Does he visit (or visits)…

What about ‘whereabouts’?

‘Whereabouts’ (always ends with an ‘s’) is both a noun and an adverb. Noun As a…

Why letters ‘A’ and ‘I’ are different

Did you know that ‘A’ and ‘I’ are the only English letters that could also stand…

Why ‘I’ is always capitalised

Did you know ‘I’ is both a letter and a word? You knew. But did you…

Why ‘am’ is always used with ‘I’

Study shows ‘am’ is becoming more popular when writers refer to themselves than ‘ I am…

Interjections: why they are different

Interjections belong to a part of speech that is often seen as minor and unimportant, but…