It is I vs It is me: the simplified explanation

There has been an age-long debate on the use of It is I/It is me and grammarians are still divided on which of them is correct or appropriate. This argument centres on the rule of predicate nominative. The predicate nominative is a noun or pronoun at the object end of a linking verb. Linking verbs are: is, was, am, has been, can be, will be, etc. The rule is that the predicate nominative should be in the subject form even in object positions. So, we’d say: It is I. It…

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Oxford comma: why comma before ‘and’, ‘or’ is necessary

This usage of the comma has instigated arguments from writers and grammarians over the years. As much as those who use it have proven its necessity, not everyone has accepted its importance. The comma before and (or or) is called a serial comma or Oxford comma (because it’s used by Oxford University Press). It is used before the penultimate (second from the last) item on a list consisting of three or more items. It’s important to use some sentences as examples to see whether this comma is really necessary or it’s just overrated.…

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Bouncy or bouncing baby: what you should know

Are you confused about using bouncy or bouncing for babies? Do you think bouncy is the adjective that tells us about healthy babies and bouncing is just a verb? Here is the explanation: It’s true that bouncy is an adjective, but so is bouncing when it refers to a healthy and strong baby or a lively person. Bouncing (adjective) Bouncing describes a healthy baby (boy or girl) or an energetic and confident person. Examples: She just gave birth to a bouncing baby boy. My bouncing baby girl is my only joy.…

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Is ‘upliftment’ a word?

Have you heard someone say ‘upliftment’ is a Nigerian English word and only acceptable in Nigeria? No, it’s not. It’s a controversial English word (from Indian English) but has found its way into some dictionaries as ‘improvement of the spiritual or moral condition of a person’. However, most speakers still insist on ‘uplift’ (noun) as the correct and acceptable form.

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English has one alphabet? Yes

Did you know some learners still think English language has 26 alphabets? No, it doesn’t. English has 26 letters but just one alphabet. An alphabet is a set of language letters arranged in a fixed order. Thus, A-Z is the English alphabet, i.e. the 26 letters are altogether called alphabet.

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