Clap him or clap for him: all the explanation you need

Do you say ‘clap for him’ or ‘clap him’? Which of them is correct? We will look at how and where different speakers (all of which speak English as a primary language) use the above expressions with a new insight for everyone, no matter which style they use. Every discourse I came across on this subject tends to be from a particular point of view (of a particular set of speakers), but we will pull them all together here. All facts are verifiable and credible. ‘Clap’ is both a noun…

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Free Ebook Download: questions, answers, explanations…

You’ve seen and studied questions/answers books, but would you love to see one with a simplified explanation of each answer? That’s what this ebook is all about. Whether you’re studying for an examination or just need lessons in modern English, this is for you. You would love it—rest assured. May you find the knowledge you seek. Download.  

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Why you shouldn’t say ‘My names are…’

People who say ‘My names are…’ think they know simple grammar than most of us because when two to three names are mentioned, they assume that’s a plural noun phrase. For the ones who would listen, let’s tell them this: a full name is a singular nominal concept because it refers to one individual and represents a single human. Whether you have one or ten first names before your surname, they refer to YOU and they all combine to form your identity. Examples: My name is Tailor Swift. My name is…

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‘see’ or ‘watch’ a movie: all you should know

Most of us know we can see a movie when we go to the cinema, but when to use watch has somehow become an unresolved subject. Even if you browse the internet, you could be more confused as no single individual seem to give a definite answer. There are answers and explanations for this seemingly confusing pair, so read this post and search no further – and we hope you find what you need. see or watch We naturally use watch to mean that we look at something that is changing or moving…

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cannot or can not: the simple rules

The difference between cannot and can not is confusing to a number of English language users. Despite that, there are simple rules to remember when you’re in a dilemma. Both cannot and can not are acceptable but usually used differently. cannot cannot is an auxiliary verb that is much more usual as the opposite of can. When you describe an ‘impossible’ situation, use cannot. Its contraction is can’t. Examples: I can do the dishes but he cannot. If I say I can, I will: if I say I cannot, I…

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