lose vs loose: how to know the difference

Are you confused about the use of lose and loose? Read this piece: lose The word lose (pronounced /lu:z/) is a verb that means ‘to no longer have something or be in control of it’, e.g. a thing, feeling, time, game, etc. The past tense and past participle form is ‘lost’. Examples: He predicted that they’ll lose the game even before it started. I don’t want to lose you, please stay with me. Digital Academy lost over a million naira last year. We told him the story and he’s losing his…

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loggerhead vs loggerheads

The words ‘loggerhead’ and ‘loggerheads’ belong to the same part of speech (nouns) but have different meanings. loggerhead A type of turtle with a large head. A shrike (a type of bird) with mainly grey feathers and black eyestripe (head’s stripe which encloses or seems to run through the eyes), wings, and tail. (old-fashioned) A foolish person.   loggerheads It is usually used as a prepositional phrase: at loggerheads. When you’re at loggerheads with someone, you strongly disagree with them or you’re in a violent dispute with them. Examples: We…

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everyday vs every day: how not to be confused

‘Everyday’ and ‘every day’ are both correct but used in different contexts, and research shows some of us confuse them. This is what we should know: every day This is a phrase that means each day. Here, every and day are two separate words. Examples: We saw each other every day for six years. Maria will do the dishes every day for the next three weeks. Just think of every as an adjective modifying the noun day. Similar phrases are: every man, every house, every phone, every step. You can…

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Judgement or judgment

Ever wonder why ‘judgement’ and ‘judgment’ are both correct? This is the answer: In British English, ‘judgement’ is the general correct spelling and applicable in everyday English. However, ‘judgment’ is preferred in legal context. In American English, ‘judgment’ is the correct spelling. This implies that the spelling used only in legal context in British English is what’s generally used in American English. Both spellings are said to have been in existence for a long time, but Noah Webster helped popularize ‘judgment’ when he compiled the American English dictionary, just like…

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Envelope vs envelop: know the difference

The difference between envelope and envelop is known to a large number of people, but some don’t even know what that’s all about. The difference is simply in the part of speech they belong to. Envelope (noun) An envelope is that square or rectangular paper container that encloses a letter. It could also be a covering for or outer layer of something, a curve or surface tangent (in mathematics), or a link in modulated wave (in electronics). Examples: Fold the letter and put it in an envelope. The glass envelope…

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