British vs American English

Writing dates: British and American styles

There are various ways of writing calendar dates in English. We can talk about writing formally or informally, and using the British or American style. British and American styles are quite unique in their different ways. Basically, British English format is day—month—year, while American English uses month—day—year. British English Dates Writing (day—month—year) 13 October 2016…

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British vs American English, Confusing Words and Expressions

Anyway and anyways: before you use them next time

Anyway and anyways have always been a pair of words contending with each other across the world and commonly used interchangeably, especially in my part of the world (Africa: Nigeria). We all learn language through various channels of communication and a vital means is listening to others. Research shows that consequently, most speakers of English…

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British vs American English, General, Grammar

Mx: a new word taking over?

English language is evolving—that’s a fact; some words have been coined and used for over 30 years but are just being reintroduced—that’s another fact. Mx, a gender-neutral honorific, is one of them. It is pronounced /miks/ and supposedly coined from the initial letter of Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms, and x (which is sometimes used for unknown). *Note that…

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British vs American English, Confusing Words and Expressions

‘Presently’ and ‘at present’: what you should always remember

These words have generated a lot of arguments over the years and some grammarians have refused to be convinced that they can be interchanged. Be that as it may, let’s look at the latest stand on them. Presently Presently can be used in both British and American English as ‘soon’ or ‘after a short period’.…

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British vs American English

British vs American English: striking spelling differences and exceptions

As expected, British and American English have different styles of spelling words that have the same meaning, but a letter or more could make the difference. These are the differences we should not forget: *Generally, -tre is British while –ter is American. Examples: British American theatre theater centre center sceptre scepter fibre fiber litre liter…

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